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Scholarly Blog Index


ACI connects researchers to curated academic blogs.


We find high quality blogs

The ACI research team discovers and evaluates blogs from all academic disciplines. Our editorial review and ongoing quality assurance help to provide focused and valuable content for researchers. Learn more about ACI


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ACI has partnered with content discovery platforms to surface high quality academic blog content within traditional research workflows. ACI makes scholarly blog content available alongside books and journal articles in discovery engines like ProQuest Summon and OCLC WorldCat.

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Full text availability

Many authors choose to license the full text of their blog articles to ACI for archiving and enhanced discoverability. For other blogs we provide an abstract with convenient access to the original text by visiting the blog. More info for blog authors

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Researchers can subscribe to ACI and the Scholarly Blog Index is also available to colleges, universities, and public libraries. A subscription provides access to advanced search and research tools as well as full text where available.

Author profiles

Authors profiles are completed by the ACI research team based on publicly-available information. Authors are encouraged to verify their profile by connecting it with their ORCID record and then submitting additions or corrections.

Most Popular Articles

C: Auxiliary Sciences of History

Spiral staircase. National Museum of Ireland, Dublin

D: History

Entering the Conversation: Using Student Blogging to Encourage Original Writing, Critical Thinking, and Personal Investment

During the fall 2016 semester, I taught Art Since 1945 and utilized WordPress as an online platform for four writing assignments. Students were asked to read and respond to an artist’s statement, evaluate an exhibition review, and consider how television, online platforms, and publications shape our collective understanding of contemporary art trends and practices. Effectively, I asked students to consider the roles of institutions, critics, artists, television producers, and online publications in shaping the conversation around contemporary art. My goal was that this series of assignments would encourage students to “enter the conversation” and become engaged practitioners in writing about contemporary art. In this post for AHTR, I will share what I learned from this experience, including both the positive outcomes and the things that I would do differently next time.

V: Naval science

@USNPeople Weekly Wire Rundown: Jan. 30, 2017

The Weekly Wire Rundown is a weekly video blog from the Office of the Chief of Naval Personnel, highlighting the top stories affecting Sailors and their families. The video compliments the print edition of the @USNPeople Weekly Wire, which you can subscribe to by e-mailing mailto:usnpeople.fct@navy.mil. It can also be downloaded at www.navy.mil/cnp. We welcome …

S: Agriculture

What does research say about how to effectively communicate about science?

Andrew Maynard, Arizona State University and Dietram A. Scheufele, University of Wisconsin-Madison Scheufele, University of Wisconsin-Madison Truth seems to be an increasingly flexible concept in politics. Many scientists and science communicators have grappled with disregard for, or inappropriate use of, scientific evidence for years – especially around contentious issues like the causes of global warming, or the benefits of vaccinating children. Only recently, however, have people begun to think systematically about what actually works to promote better public discourse and decision-making around what is sometimes controversial science. The goal was to apply scientific thinking to the process of how we go about communicating science effectively. The public draft of the group’s findings – “Communicating Science Effectively: A Research Agenda” – has just been published. Bacteriologists engage with kids at the Wisconsin Science Festival, one way of communicating science to the public. But it also depends on what people feel and believe is right and the societal or political contexts within which communication and engagement occur. Unfortunately, the social sciences haven’t provided science communicators with concrete, evidence-based guidance on how to communicate more effectively. Two earlier NAS meetings identified how diverse the areas of expertise are when it comes to research on science communication. For instance, it’s becoming increasingly…

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